Posted on

Davids 81 Scirocco

David called and said his 16v was making some “extra” noise, which he believed to be a rod bearing that took an unscheduled leave of absence..  David is from the great white north and had the car shipped down to us to look it over and try to come up with a game plan for his best options moving forward.  We weighed rebuilding the 16v, adding modern fuel management, even forced induction.  After several conversations about options he actually decided that a VR6 would be a nice mid ground to having a NA car, with modern injection control, and a fun to drive powerband.

So I got to work:

Ok, so I had to take advantage of the fact there were 3 red roccos here at the same time..

Now I really got to work…

With the old 16v out, the bay had a few issues from previous owners, while I do not sell myself as a paint and body shop, I will make repairs and spray an engine bay for a customer.

Back side of the repairs seam sealed and ready for service.
With the holes fixed, the bay was ready to paint.

A new coat of paint goes a long way in an old engine bay.

Onto getting the new driveline ready, I had an 04 touareg motor with under 80k on it.  With a touareg motor into a tranverse chassis there are a few pieces you need to swap from either a 2.8 BDF or mk4 r32 motor.  Oil filter housing, oil pump and pan,  exhaust manifolds, accessory bracket (if you want to keep AC, otherwise you can use the treg bracket and accessories) lower timing cover needs to be ground down to clear the trans.

As a rule I always replace service or wear items on a motor before I install it,  so this motor got chains, guides, rear main seal, plugs, coil packs, waterpump, water transfer pipe, thermostat housing, thermostat, valve cover and manifold gaskets.

With all of that done, I was ready to fit the motor.

As you can see the radiator is in before I fit the motor, I cover this in our install videos but this gets overlooked more often than I’d like to hear about.   I am using one of the S&P Mk1 Vr6 radiators with a single fan and a 70c fan switch.

David insisted that we find an Audi intake manifold to dress the motor up a bit over the boring Touareg manifold,  good call on his part, looks great on top of the VR lump.

I knocked out a hidden MAF intake, a remote fill bottle for the coolant system which finished off the plumbing to the radiator and heater core.  These along with the valve cover and upper strut brace got a wrinkle black powder coated finish from TopNotchCustoms located here in town.

Onto wiring,  as with many of these cars the wiring had been touched by alot of people, and they all left their mark..

I removed a lot of the old management wiring, some was even left from the 81 motor that was long gone,  there were abandon relays, multiple wire taps for radios or accessories at some point.  All of it needed to go and start with just what was needed for the current setup in the car.

With the interior wiring in a better place, I moved onto the battery which was moved to the back, using an S&P Battery Box I mounted the Optima Red Top into place with a main breaker mounted on the box itself, this prevents having a 2ga torch running the length of the car if you have a short between the battery and the fusebox/starter/alternator junction point.

The original headlights were tired, I installed some LED low beams and h4 high beams with a pair of Hella relays to keep the load off the switch, this also gave me time to put the face back on the ‘rocco.

Time to get under the car and install the exhaust system. Using a 2.5″ stainless kit from TT with a Borla muffler gets the VR notes out in the perfect way without getting that drone while cruising the highway.

Onto suspension brakes and bearings, I installed a set of Mk1 Solowerks Coilovers  along with new bearings into the ‘rocco spindles, the car was already setup for 10.1″ 16v brakes so just a hardware refresh was needed there.

The seatbelt retracts were sticky, and unresponsive so we sent them out to Safety Restore and had them install some red belts for a bit of color on the inside, David once again was right, it looks great without being LOUD.

With all the safety issues covered it was ready for some road tests.

With all the safety issues covered it was ready for some road tests.

Exhaust Video

Driving Video

I was able to take it to a local show before it had to be loaded up and head home to the Great White North.

This has been one of my personal favorites, its not overstated, its not slammed beyond function, its a ton of fun to drive (yes even in the corners thanks to sway bars and reasonable ride height), it sounds great, it looks good enough to be brought to any GTG or show, but doesn’t have brand new don’t touch me with anything but a diaper paint.  Overall a well sorted car, I hope David gets many years of enjoyment out of it.

Parts available from S&P

Mk1 Vr6 Hardware Kit – Base

Cable Clutch Kit 

S&P Radiator – Vr6 Mk1

Vr6 AAA Based coolant hoses

Tach Adapter

Speedo Cable

Mk1 SS Exhaust

MK1 Vr6 24v downpipe

Solowerks Coilovers

Wiring Services

S&P Battery Box

LUK clutch kit

Posted on

Summer Software Sale

It’s time for a summer sale, if you are thinking about a mk4 motor swap for your mk1, we are offering 20 percent off your wiring harness work or ecu tuning when you purchase an integration kit from us. This offer is good until around mid August. Purchase of the integration kit must be between July 10 and August 15, your harness can be scheduled up to a month after that. image image

 

Posted on

Video review of the MK1 02a 02j hardware kits

Ryan at VWDiesel.net was kind enough to do a review on our products..

Check it out!!!

 

Looking forward to your build notes and video Ryan!

 

 

Posted on

Its Grumman time

Check out our build on our new shop truck! Its a Grumman Olsen Kubvan

Click the pic or go to ORIGINALS>1983 GRUMMAN

kubvan 017Kubvan on the Mobile Dyno at SOWO14

 

 

Posted on

24 Karat, a healthy heart hidden by pure VW gold.

Sometimes people just need to get back to the basics, or at least appear like they are. With alot of the automotive enthusiasts leaning toward how their car “sits”, going as far as making sure the angle of their stretch matches the curve of their freshly rolled fender. All of that just to have a speed bump ruin their day, or burn their tires off on the fender lip instead of the asphalt, it seems like alot of time wasted on something that didn’t make it anymore fun to drive (for me).

So I set out to build something that looked unassuming to most people. There have been plenty of mk2 VR6 swaps, in fact there is an entire forum community dedicated to it. However, 99% of the swaps you see, are the 12v version from a 93-99 MK3/passat or corrado. The 2.8 BDF motor was a great improvement to its slightly older, yet less refined brother, the AAA, (which was renamed the AFP for the mk4 generation even though the internals are the same). The BDF also MAY be the little brother to the R32 motor, but it is no slouch by any means. (I think the R motor is on PEDs anyway) ..

I was able to reuse and refresh the factory tweed interior, found a few missing early westy parts, even scored a set of low bolster tweed Recaros. A set of Ronals holds the car to the ground while providing the “This car may still have an 8v in it look” that I was looking for.
Interior

null
I will have to admit, I like to make sure the car looks good, there are alot of painted or color matched parts on this car, but there is no avoiding corners, bumps or dips in fear of my tires colliding with my fenders. I intend to drive this car, and enjoy every corner, straightaway and chicane (within the posted speed limits of course).

In closing, I could not be happier with this car, the way it drives or the way it looks, you can have a good looking car that can also enjoy a mountain drive. Put the PS3 controller down and go for a drive. Any day driving your project or creation is better than anything sony can simulate.